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ASPEN MAGAZINE NO. 8 FALL-WINTER $4


ART INFORMATION AND SCIENCE INFORMATION SHARE THE SAME WORLD AND LANGUAGES...


DAVID ANTIN 3 MUSICS FOR 2 VOICES

TERRY ATKINSON AND MICHAEL BALDWIN HOT/COLD BOOK

JO BAER ART & VISION: MACH BANDS

PHILIP GLASS 1+1 FOR ONE PLAYER AND AMPLIFIED TABLE TOP

DAN GRAHAM GUEST EDITOR: EDITORIAL NOTES; ENDS

GEORGE MACIUNAS GUEST DESIGNER

JACKSON MACLOW FIVE TURTLE ASYMMETRIES (WITH RECORDING)

ROBERT MORRIS LOS ANGELES PROJECT

DENNIS OPPENHEIM ECOLOGIC PROJECTS

YVONNE RAINER THREE DISTRIBUTIONS

EDWARD RUSCHA PARKING LOT

RICHARD SERRA LEAD SHOT

ROBERT SMITHSON STRATA

LA MONTE YOUNG NOTES ON CONTINUOUS PERIODIC COMPOSITE SOUND WAVEFORM ENVIRONMENT REALIZATIONS (WITH RECORDING)

COVER PAINTING BY JO BAER


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EDITORIAL NOTE This issue where artists have conceived and (in part) designed their contributions as pieces and part of a larger schema may aid in redefining the magazine's place in (and as) art in (and as participant in), the larger world. It suggests further scope and proposals. ONE PROPOSAL: (might be:) an issue (a sort of art and technology exhibition) on the subject of INFORMATI0N, whose constituent units would function doubly: as advertisements for designated information-media (computer-data-processing, network TV, radio, telephone, think tank, dating service, duplication) companies and also as works of art. Artists (musicians, writers, artists, dancers) would be selected and arrangements made with various companies for participation in-forming a work. This arrangement, would serve a twofold function: the artist might help the corporation in establishing its corporate image while the corporation might help the artist in freeing some of the limitations in relation to the reader and socio-economic frameworks. Beyond the initial selection of the artists and companies all decisions on the project would be corporate/between the contributors themselves and between the individual contributor and his company. The company and the artist would be responsible for the production and design of their unit, the cost subsumed by the corporation in exchange for rights to its use in advertising and public relations. Companies would be free to use the ad/art in any context they deem important: in trade shows or as part of a magazine., TV, radio or other media campaign. As in the nature of this type of information the usefullness effect - impact - meaning of these ads/artworks would be immediate, topical and more or less short-lived. The collected printed matter would be issued in a mass magazine special issue as information-art, profits from the use going to the artists. Later the same information would be provided free of charge to any museum wishing to use the contents in a show providing that the museum invites some or all of the artists to continue first hand the in-formation process in meeting with the public. DIFFERING VIEWS Some of the contributors in this proposed issue of information undoubtedly will have entirely different concepts than mine. GENESIS 0F AD FORM While in the past the book and later the magazine form has served to represent (re-present) (contain) the author's privileged insight (or several author's points of view) to the masses of individual readers who've bought and identified the experience, magazines serving as part and parcel of a socio-economic structure which necessitates and perpetuates this system of single dimension, single fixed point of view (of a complex of points) representation (each magazine had covered a field - its form assuming that enough private points of view - static - of its readers and its authors can be brought in line with the line of its advertisers whose ads support the magazine's existence): my writing does not have a point of view (mine or a priori determined by the form); instead its point of view is continually shifting, feedback contingent in its place (time and context) and its relationship to the readership who individually and collectively compose or in-form its meaning. The magazine as a static collection of points of view is easily subverted by placing an ad whose form and point is related directly to the readers' use of and response to: the astrology-dating ad (for instance), where categories or reference-fields have been severed f or it's art and it's science and it's the sociology of art (no history) or none of these definitions. MOVING INFORMATION In reading - in fact a reader's mind's eye is changing: his position continually shifting. The signs on the page function simply as vectors: switching terminuses in the transaction between the activating authorial mover, the world out there and the activated moved reader who, finishing, left to shift for himself in another place - continues the transaction (in another time and space); reading isn't another order of time or experience apart. The information vector present would amount to re-directing the flow of this traffic (it wouldn't be the sum of my experience per se or add up to any ideas out of place) not by establishing points, but pointing directly to the outside world - to products to be played (maybe records) and services to be rendered (further in-forming the reader) as they in-form that in-formation being correlated with the previous in-formation which the user has read in magazine presentation. Then two in-formations would each function separately and relatedly at the same time rather than as one or a series of isolated points in time. My only relation to the subject matter of the in-formation would be in placing the vectors in operation. Dan Graham © SECTION 1 ASPEN NO. 8

 








1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000.00000000
100,000,000,000,000,000,000.00000000
3,573,000,000.00000000
205.00000000
2.85000000
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miles to the edge of the known universe
miles to the edge of the galaxy (Milky Way)
miles to the edge of the solar system (Pluto)
miles to Washington, D.C.
miles to Times Square, New York City
miles to Union Square subway stop
miles to the corner of 14th Street and First Avenue
miles to front door of Apartment 1D, 153 First Avenue
miles to the typewriter page
miles to the lens of glasses
miles to cornea from retinal wall










 
 




 

DAVID ANTIN Born 1932 in New York City. His Three Musics for Two Voices is one of a series of taped soundtracks originally commissioned by the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, where he was a curator in 1967-68. So far he has completed three soundtracks, one of which recently appeared in Caterpillar Magazine 7. He is currently working on a fourth which is accompanied by movie sequences. He has published two books of poetry: Definitions (Caterpillar Press) and Code of Flag Behavior (Black Sparrow Press) and several sections of a long work called Autobiography, the first section of which was published by Something Else Press. He is now working on a book on art and technology to be published by Viking Press and since winding up his doctoral work in linguistics has been director of the Gallery for the University of California at San Diego, where he is a member of the Visual Arts Department.


TERRY ATKINSON Born 1940 in England. 1963, 1st prize for painting, Young Contemporaries. 1964-66, lecturer at Birmingham College of Art. 1966 to present, lecturer at Coventry College of Art. January-February 1967, works on peripheral formation of ideas concerning the eventual project concretized in the Bainbridge-Hurrell Exhibition at the Architectural Association. March 1967, starts work with Michael Baldwin on Air-Conditioning Project which is completed following May. July-September 1967, visits New York and Los Angeles, meets Sol LeWitt, Dan Graham, Carl Andre and Robert Smithson. Continues exchange of ideas, work, etc. with LeWitt and Graham, up to present time. October 1967, starts work with Baldwin on theoretical projects, Air Show, Time Show and Hot-Cold Book. January 1968, works on Frameworks project with Baldwin. Contributes literature, along with Baldwin and Harold Hurrell, to David Bainbridge's M1 project for Birmingham show. May 1968, French Army model completed with Baldwin. November 1968, along with Bainbridge, Baldwin and Hurrell, forms Art and Language Press. January 1969, French Army model Mown at Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, England.


JO BAER Born 1929, Seattle, Washington. Studied zoology at University of Washington. Did graduate work with H. Wallach and H.L. Teuberr at the New School for Social Research, New York. Museum shows: Systematic Painting, Guggenheim Museum, 1966; Art in Series, Finch College Museum of Art, 1967; Whitney Annual, Whitney Museum of American Art, 1967; Documenta V, Kassel, Germany, 1968; Art in '69, Museum Artenaum, Helsinki, Finland; Corcoran Biannual, Corcoran Museum, Washington, D.C., 1969.


MICHAEL BALDWIN Born 1946 in England. 1964-67, lecturer at Coventry College of Art. 1966, 1st prize for painting, Northern Young Contemporaries September 1966, Terry Atkinson takes up lecturing post at Coventry College of Art; through him, Baldwin meets David Bainbridge and Harold Hurrell. March 1967, starts work with Atkinson on Air-Conditioning Show. October 1967, works with Atkinson on Air Show, Time Show and Hot-Cold Book. January 1968, works with Atkinson on Frameworks project. February-April 1968, contributes literature, along with Atkinson and Hurrell, to Bainbridge's M1 project for Birmingham show. May 1968, French Army model completed with Atkinson. November 1968, along with Atkinson, Bainbridge and Hurrell, forms Art and Language Press. January 1969, French Army model shown at Ikon Gallery, Birmingham.


PHILIP GLASS Born Jan. 31, 1937, Baltimore, Maryland. Received a B.A. degree from the University of Chicago in 1956 and an M.S. from the Julliard School, of Music in 1962. Between 1962 and 1964, received two grants from the Ford Foundation and in 1965 a Fulbright grant for study in France. Since 1967 , has been living and working in New York City. Recent concerts: An Afternoon of Live and Electronic Music by Philip Glass and Steve Reich, Queens College N.Y., 1968; Tone-Roads, New School for Social Research, 1968; New Music: Philip Glass, Filmmakers Cinematheque, 1968; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam 1969; Galerie Ricke, Cologne, 1969; Kunsthalle, Bern, 1969; An Evening of Live/Electronic Music, New School for Social Research, 1969; Anti-Illusion: Procedures/Materials, Whitney Museum, 1969.


DAN GRAHAM Born in Urbana, Illinois at 2:20A.M. March 31,1942. Directed the John Daniels Gallery, 1964-65. Has placed ads in ASPEN,THE VILLAGE VOICE, ARTFORUM; articles in ART AND ARTISTS, ARTFORUM, ARTS, extensions, THE WEST SIDE NEWS AND FREE PRESS, METRO; photographs in ARTS YEARBOOKS, ART INTERNATIONAL, METRO, MINIMAL ART (anthology); poetry in ASPEN, extensions, HARPER'S BAZAAR, 0 TO 9; the introduction for the catalogue Dan Flavin, Chicago Museum of Contemporary Art; exhibited in Projected Art, Finch College Museum, Dwan Gallery, Focus on Light, New Jersey State Museum, School of Visual Arts Gallery, Paula Cooper Gallery... His subject matter is in-formation.


GEORGE MACIUNAS born: 1931, Kaunas, LTSR, USSR. Soc. security no: 106-24-6003 Drivers i.d. no: MO 1088 14198 837093 (7996134) Passport no: B 665003 Resale certificate: 707 7139 Bank account 0210-0012: 086-015036 latest balance $1 Blood type 0, WBC 9000; hemoglobin 16 gm; pulse 110; blood pressure 120/80; head-normocephalic; eyes-sclerae clear; fundi-benign; ear-ceruminous; heart-sinus tachycardia; nose & throat culture-normal flora; culture from right antrum-Klebsiellaaerobacter group; Adenoidectomy-1938, Appendectomy-1940.


JACKSON MACLOW Born Sept. 12, 1922, Chicago. Studied at the Chicago Musical College, Northwestern University's Music School and University of Chicago In New York after 1943, active in anarchist, pacificist and civil-rights movements; intermittently active in the theater (helped produce and acted in two plays by' Paul Goodman; acted, wrote music for The Marrying Maiden, produced by The Living Theater 1960-61. Works since 1954 have explored use of systematic chance operations, various degrees of indeterminacy, long silences and simultaneous speech, combined with musical sounds and noises, actions, painted signs, slide projections and movies. Examples have been published and performed in various U.S. cities and in England, France, Germany, Denmark, Italy, Japan, Canada, Mexico, Belgium, The Netherlands, etc. Works have appeared in many periodicals and anthologies. Books: The Marrying Maiden; The Twin Plays; Questions & Answers... A Topical Play; The Pronouns-A Collection of 40 Dances-For the Dancers; August Light Poems (Caterpillar); 22 Light Poems (Black Sparrow Press); Stanzas for Iris Lezak (Something Else Press).


ROBERT MORRIS Born 1931 in Kansas City, Missouri. Studied at the University of Kansas City, Kansas City Art Institute, California School of Fine Arts, Reed College, and Hunter College where he has been an assistant professor since 1967. One-man shows: Dilexi Gallery, San Francisco (1957, 58); Green Gallery, NYC (1963, 64, 65); Gallerie Schmela, Dusseldorf (1964); Dwan Gallery, Los Angeles (1966); Leo Castelli Gallery (1966, 68, 69); Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (1968); Galerie Ileana Sonnabend, Paris (1968). His work has been shown in many group shows, including: 1963 — Black, White& Grey, Wadsworth Atheneum. 1965 — Young America, Whitney Museum. 1966 — Primary Structures, Jewish Museum; Contemporary American Sculpture Selection I and Sculpture Annual, Whitney Museum; 68th American Exhibition, Art Institute of Chicago. 1967 — American Sculpture of the Sixties, Los Angeles County Museum; The 1960's, Museum of Modern Art; International Institute, Buenos Aires; 5th Guggenheim International Exhibition. 1968 — Buffalo Festival of the Arts; Minimal Art, The Hague, Netherlands; Art of the Real, Museum of Modern Art; The Pure and Clear, Philadelphia Museum of Art; Annual Exhibition, Whitney Museum. 1969 — New Media: New Methods, Museum of Modern Art Circulating Exhibition; Soft Art, New Jersey State Museum; Square Pegs in Round Holes, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; When Attitude Becomes Form, Kunsthalle, Bern; and University of Puerto Rico.


DENNIS OPPENHEIM Born 1938, Mason City, Washington. In 1966 received an MA Painting from Stanford University and a Newhouse Foundation Grant. Oneman shows include: John Gibson Gallery (1968, 69); Green Gallery, San Francisco (1968); Belmonte Gallery, Sacramento (1965, 66, 67); Yvon Lambert, Paris and Milan (1968). Group shows include: 1969 — Sculpture Annual, Whitney Museum; Earth Art, Cornell University; New Media, Museum of Modern Art; Kunsthalle, Bern; and Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam. 1968 — Language II and Earthworks, Dwan Gallery. 1967 — Annual Small Sculpture & Drawing Exhibition, Western Washington State College; Small Sculpture & Drawing Annual, Muncie, Indiana; Art 66, University of Santa Clara; American Drawings, Erie Art Center. 1965 — Symbolon 128, Wesleyan College, Macon, Ga.; Drawing Invitational, Oakland Museum; Painting& Drawing Annual, Richmond, Calif. Art Center.


YVONNE RAINER Born 1934 in San Francisco. Studied dance with Martha Graham, Merce Cunningham, Ann Halprin, Robert Dunn and many ballet schools in New York City. Performed with James Waring, Aileen Passloff, Beverly Schmidt, Judith Dunn and Steve Paxton. Appeared in the first Concert of Dance at Judson Memorial Church and subsequently started the Judson Dance Workshop with Steve Paxton in 1962. Group concerts include: Living Theater; New School for Social Research; Nine Evenings: Festival of Theater & Engineering at the 69th Regiment Armory; The Once Festival at Ann Arbor, Michigan; Buffalo Arts Festival; America on Wheels, Washington D.C. (1963) and Now Festival (1966); Moderna Museet, Stockholm (1964, 65); Kunstacademie, Dusseldorf (1964); University of Lund, Sweden (1965); Copenhagen (1965); Commonwealth Institute, London (1965); Spoleto, Italy (Festival of Two Worlds, 1967). Major works include: Terrain (Judson Church, 1963); Parts of Some Sextets (Wadsworth Atheneum; Hartford, Conn. 1965); Carriage Discreteness (Nine Evenings.. 1966); The Mind is a Muscle (Now Festival 1966); Rose Fractions (Billy Rose Theater, New York, 1969). Her articles have appeared in Tulane Drama Review, Mon, Arts Magazine, Minimal Art, A Critical Anthology and 0 to 9.


STEVE REICH Born Oct. 3, 1936, New York City. Studied philosophy at Cornell and composition at Julliard and Mills College; active at the San Francisco Tape Music Center during 1964 and 1965. Collaborated with William Wiley in theater event, Over Evident Falls, 1968. Recent performances of his music at Yale University, New School for Social Research, School of Visual Arts, Museum of Modern Art, Whitney Museum, Fylkingen Festival in Sweden, and the Orchestral Space Festival, Tokyo. His scores and/or articles have appeared in Source No. 3, in John Cage's book Notations, and the Whitney Museum's Anti-Illusion catalog. Recorded works: Come Out, on CBS Odyssey Records; Piano Phase, recorded by Toshi Ichiyanagi and Yukio Tsuchiya on Victor of Japan; It's Gonna Rain and Violin Phase recorded by Paul Zukofsky on Columbia Records.


EDWARD RUSCHA Born 1937 in Omaha, Nebraska; lived in Oklahoma City for 15 years; studied at Chouinard Art Institute; now living and working in Los Angeles. One-man exhibitions: Ferus Gallery, Los Angeles, 1963, 64, 65; Alexander lolas Gallery, New York, 1967; Irving Blum Gallery, Los Angeles, 1968; Rudolf Zwirner, Cologne, 1967. Group exhibitions include: Four Oklahoma Artists, Oklahoma City Art Center, 1960; New Painting of Common Objects, Pasadena Art Museum, 1962; Six More, Los Angeles County Museum, 1963; Pop Art USA, Oakland Art Museum, 1963; American Drawings, Guggenheim Museum, 1964; Words and Images, Guggenheim Museum, 1965; Ten from Los Angeles, Seattle Art Museum, 1966; Los Angeles Now, Robert Fraser Gallery, London, 1966; IX Sao Paulo Bienhale, Sao Paulo, Brazil, 1967; Fifth Paris Biennale, Museum of Modern Art, Paris, 1967; Whitney Annual, Whitney Museum, 1967. Since 1962 has published a series of his own photographic books, including Twenty-Six Gasoline Stations, Various Small Fires, Some Los Angeles Apartments, Every Building on the Sunset Strip, Thirtyfour Parking Lots, Royal Road Test, Business Cards, and Nine Swimming Pools.


RICHARD SERRA Born 1939 in San Francisco. One-man exhibitions: Galleria La Salita, Rome (1966); Galerie Ricke, Cologne (1968). Group exhibitions: From Arp to Artschwager, Noah Goldowsky Gallery, New York (1967); 9 at Leo Castelli, Leo Castelli Warehouse (1968); Kunstmarkt, Cologne (1968); Here & Now, Washington University Gallery of Art, St. Louis (1969); When Attitudes 8ecome Form, Kunsthalle, Bern (1969); Square Pegs in Round Holes, Stedelijk, Amsterdam (1969); AntiIllusion: Procedure/Materials, Whitney Museum (1969); Theodoron: 9 Young Artists, Guggenheim Museum (1969).


ROBERT SMITHSON Born 1938 in Passaic, New Jersey. One-man shows: Artist's Gallery (1959); Galleria George Lester, Rome (1961); Dwan Gallery (1966, 67, 68, 69); Konrad Fischer Gallery, Dusseldorf (1968, 69). Group exhibitions include: 19 66 — Primary Structures, Jewish Museum; Art in Process, Finch College Museum; Sculpture Annual, Whitney Museum. 1967 — American Sculpture of the Sixties, Los Angeles County Museum; Art in Series, Finch College Museum. 1968 — Buffalo Festival of the Arts; Minimal Art, The Hague; Art of the Real, Museum of Modern Art; Prospect 68, Kunsthalle, Dusseldorf; Options, Milwaukee Art Center and Chicago Museum of Contemporary Art; Earthworks, Dwan Gallery. 1969 — Sculpture Annual, Whitney Museum; Earth Art, Cornell University; Op Losse Schroeven, Stedelijk, Amsterdam.


LA MONTE YOUNG Born Oct. 14, 1935 in Bern, Idaho. Received his B.A. in 1958 from the University of California in Los Angeles where he majored in music. Studied composition with Leonard Stein (former Schoenberg assistant) and attended Karlheinz Stockhausen's seminar at Darmstadt in 1959. Studied at Berkeley under a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship and served as teaching assistant in the Music Department. In 1960 won the Alfred Hertz Memorial Traveling Scholarship and studied electronic music with Richard Maxfield. In 1966, received grants from both the Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts and the Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Served as musical director, The Ann Halprin Dance Company, 1959-1960; director of the Theater of Eternal Music, 1962 to present; editor and co-publisher of An Anthology, 1960-62; music editor, S.M.S., 1968. Major compositions include: VISION (1959); POEM FOR CHAIRS, TABLES,AND BENCHES, ETC., OR OTHER SOUND SOURCES (1960); 2 SOUNDS (1960) which Merce Cunningham uses in his Winterbranch; THE SECOND DREAM OF THE HIGH-TENSION LINE STEPDOWN TRANSFORMER (1962); and THE TORTOISE, HIS DREAMS AND JOURNEYS (1964 to present).

 








 

Original format: Printed folder, 11 by 11 inches.

 
 
 

 

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